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Humane Meat? Not Possible; Legalizing Pot is Common Sense; Advocate Gives Space to Liars

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Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Humane Meat? Not Possible

In response to “Here’s the Beef” (January 16, 2014), about the opening of Sutter Meats: trendy words “sustainable,” and “locavore” may ease the minds of meat-eating consumers, but they obscure the remaining fact of fear, suffering and death for animals whose carcasses will be supplied to Sutter by Adams Farm Slaughterhouse in Athol. To be received at Adams Farm, located some 40 miles away from Northampton, locally raised animals will still be forced into trailers for a stressful drive.

Adams Farm touts a slaughter process using cages and chutes designed by Dr. Temple Grandin. Grandin is an animal behavioral scientist who made her career selling “improvements” in holding cages and chutes in which animals walk to the killing floor in the last minutes of their lives. If her designs reduce animal stress hormones, that’s clearly for marketing a “better product” and of little benefit to animals. Grandin sits on the “Animal Welfare Council” of McDonald’s Corporation. McDonald’s similarly touts using “humane” slaughter methods in consultation with Temple Grandin.

A few years ago, PETA commended Grandin’s work, resulting in an outcry from some of their membership. Consequently, PETA president Ingrid Newkirk issued a statement that “There is no such thing as humane meat.” If you believe there is such a thing, then I have a bridge in New Jersey to sell you—and its arteries are clogged.

Sutter, Adams, McDonald’s: I’m still not lovin’ it!


Legalizing Pot is Common Sense

I’m excited to hear that Massachusetts residents will likely be voting on marijuana legalization in two years. I’m a Massachusetts native who spends part of the year in Colorado. The support for the marijuana legalization program in Colorado is incredibly high, and for good reasons. Part of it is simply economic. The state is saving money by not prosecuting pot cases. And taxes from retail sales are bringing in a lot of money to the state, the first $40 million of which are going to fund public schools. Everyone wins in this scenario.

The other reason it’s popular is basic compassion. This is 2014, and the relative safety of marijuana is known by now. Why are we still putting people in jail for a plant that has never directly killed anyone, and has a lot of medical value? Just about the only organized opposition to legalization comes from the police, whose budgets depend on criminalizing pot.

Like gay marriage and like desegregation decades ago, marijuana legalization is a common-sense step towards a more fair and compassionate society, and Massachusetts should follow the progressive lead of Colorado and Washington. If you care about this issue, please go to www.masscann.org, and lend a hand.

 

Advocate Gives Space to Liars

Really, Valley Advocate? You’re joining the right wing media in spouting unsupported propagada against the Affordable Care Act (Guest Column: “Another Train Wreck,” January 9, 2014)? The vast majority of Americans do indeed want access to affordable healthcare. The ACA will lower costs considerably, not raise them. Up is down and down is up if you listen to this “guest columnist.” I notice he’s from a Koch brothers-affilated think tank started by none other than master propagandist Dick Armey. What more do you need to know about him? Why would the Advocate give space to such destructive liars? I used to look forward to reading the Advocate. I’ll get my news from more reliable and responsible sources from now on.

 

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